Real pirates will never give up!

There was ice this morning. It has been a very cold night onboard the Harry Louella. The three pirates left onboard to finnish up the preparations for our wintering of the ship are sleeping with double covers, hats and jackets to keep out the cold. It is time for us to get moving, but before we can do that – the ship must come out of the water and we need to know where to sleep the next couple of days. Not to forget where in the world will we find our next ship?

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Waking up to slippery deck and frost all over.

Our fourth pirates for peace-pirate has once again taken off to Nynäshamn to take care of some business. We will go there one of the next days. Yesterday we were towed from Fyrudden to Gryt early in the morning and later in the day we detached our beautiful mast and sent it to storage. But for now, we are waiting for the people of the wharf to make the time of lifting our boat ashore so we can cover it up and prepare the engine for winter.

There are times where our adventure seem to be a hard nut to crack. But let it be said that this crew will never give up the journey toward world peace. We are not the first pirates to be temporary without a ship – and even in these dark times our crew is masters of keeping up hope and the fight for our cause and will once again, mark my words, soon be back at the sea!

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Being towed in early rainy mornings.

This said, we have lost the fight against the winter and will have to move ourselves in some other way down to a warmer climate. Where, how and when still has to be determined and this will be done within a few short days. The last of our tasks will be to pack whatever we can carry from Harry Louella but it look like there will be a lot of tools, equipment and other useful things left for the next lucky owners of this amazing boat. Let us know if you are interested in a cheap pirate-ship!

This also means that we will not be able to sail down through Europe in this turn around. This is very sad of course – since we have met a lot of great Europeans this summer that it would be a privilege to meet up with on our way south.

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The last voyage for us onboard Harry Louella.

For now however, feel free to check in on the blog for updates. I will keep you posted on our progress for better or worse, but know that we are pirates with great hope and this adventure will go on for a very long time into the future – until we reach our goal of world peace or longer.

Captain Jack

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Game over

Yes. This ship has had it’s better days, we knew that when we got it. We’ve had a great run – but it seems like the current harbour is the final stop for us on this ship. After having been rescued 3 times, sunk twise, countless fixes and weeks of gentle care has not even gotten us out of the kingdom of Sweden.

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Sea rescue to the rescue.

Harry Louella isn’t working anymore. Transmission is totally scrucked and we are stuck in yet another harbour, and this time it seems final. There is of course a chance that we can get it running, but the time and cost of this fix might just be what pull us out of the game with this ship.

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Harry Louella at what might be her last stop.

This do not mean that we are giving up. We need a few days to reconfigure the plan – but I can promise you that we are not of those who give up. We have made some sort of plan, as we spent a few hours on a deserted island about an our tow out in nowhere yesterday. The sea rescue pulled us in to Fyrudden where we now are tied up to the guest harbour.

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Towed by sea rescue.

Lucky for us, there is a grocery-store here and the bus comes several times a day. We should be able to survive in this village for the time being. We even made a friend here allready. Felix, a island-owner across the bay that came over last night, bringing champagne and beer from his fathers brewery up north.

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The colors of a great morning.

In short – it’s hard to say what to say at this point. We are once again stranded fighting for a plan to make this work for all of us. I suppose this is a turn for the worse. But we are pirates, we never give up!

Captain Jack

 

Sinking twice in one day

We were just about to maneuver our very much smoking ship into the guest harbour of Nynäshamn when then engine stopped working again. The newly fixed exhaust pipe, that new crew member David spent hours to fix, had totally stopped sending the exhaust through the system and filled the whole ship with headache-bringing thick smog into the cockpit instead.

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If it wasn’t for the floorboards and the cold water, this would be a nice hot-tub.

The last two hours we had spent driving through darkness, navigating by the help of costal lighthouses and flashing red and green lights. We had calculated our journey down to the last nautical mile when it came to diesel. But then, 40 meters from the dock, we ran out and had to drift the last bit. We waited in silence all begging not to hit other boats in the harbour. But with the skills of experienced Captain Simen we docked perfectly in between two other sleeping ships.

At the dock we met up with our fourth crew-member that had went ahead to make some private arrangements, leaving us with the task of fixing up the newly rescued ship in Dalarö. Conny was in good health waiting for us at the dock. We hadn’t had the chance of speaking too much with him about our arrival since David dropped his cellphone in the only puddle onboard the boat a few hours earlier while we rode the waves between our destinations. There was of course only one thing to do – celebrate the crew-reunion.

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Tha magnificent ship “Tre Kronor” of Sweden as next-door neighbours.

I woke up the next morning hearing Conny scream something about water. A short look around the ship was all that was needed to activate the general alarm onboard. We were knee-high in water. The ship was sinking. We quickly got the big pump and both bilges running and managed to drain a few ton of water within ten-fifteen minutes. Now, everything was wet and miserable. We saved what we could and left the rest to dry while we spent a few hours away from our very much problematic floating home.

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Changing oil after flooding the engine twice.

When we got back in the afternoon the same freaking shit had happened again. The water was high above the maximum waterlevel the engine can take. Still below the air-vents but the oil was once again compromised. This time it was our own fault, we had turned of the power without thinking about tha fact that our pumps where running. But what can we do.. Life must go on, we turned the big pump back on and started the work of draining the oil for salty water.

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Captain Jack wIting in Nynäshamn.

Captain Simen and Conny took the long ride into a place with cheaper stores to get new impellers and a new exhaust-pipe. We simply can’t continue breathing diesel-smog as we continue down the coast. Everything should be in order now, we will keep moving on our journey south tomorrow morning. If we can find the money for diesel.

Captain Jack

Harry Louellas dieselfund

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Dealing with an old lady

You wouldn’t think we were about to spend several days in Dalarö as we were passing through the other day. Since then we have tried to leave several times, but it seems that this little place of an island has caught us pretty good. Once we fix one problem – another one is pushing through. At times we are about to give up and when everything is looking good we try – and fail again. 

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Us passing time after long days of work.

We’ve got to remember that this ship is something like 70 years old. We are in theory running a nursing-home, having to medicate the old lady – treating her for all the symptoms. To make it easier for you to understand I have made this list of problems we’ve dealt with since we were last rescued:

  • Nobody told us that there was supposed to be oil in the gear-box. Maybe too obvious to most, we didn’t get the memo. By help of a local we discovered this (hopefully just in time) and filled it with oil that now have to be drained cause it proved to be water in there.
  • The exhaust has been leaking inside the cockpit – making it a bit of a foggy dream to navigate the beast, but we have managed so far. The leaks have been located.
  • The diesel-filters are not working. Probably being the reason for our engine-fail that lead to us having to be rescued the other day. They’ll have to be changed in order for us to continue. We are currently waiting for our friend, the Norwegian pirate, to deliver these after he have fixed his own ship back in Spillersboda.
  • After the fire we’ve had to clean out the kamin in order to stay warm. This should however be back in order.
  • All the water had to be carried all across the harbour since the people running this place have not installed water to the guest harbour.
  • The air-filter has seen better days, it is basically dead – but we have got a new one ready to install.
  • There is still water coming in. We will have to plaster the ship from the inside in places we can reach. It’s totally under control, but we need to keep an eye out for the leaks.
  • There was a hole in the saltwater-cooling system that brought in water. This was solved yesterday.
  • Other problems are not listed here because we want to keep some of them to ourselves.

We are currently 3 crew-members onboard. The fourth left us yesterday to eat veal in Nyneshamn – The harbour we’ve been trying to get to the last week or so. His name is Conny, one of the guys we met on our journey to Finland and back last week. He is an awesome chain smoker with history in hospitality and life. Born in Sweden and previous citizen of Nyneshamn he went to take care of some business until the rest of us can get there.

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In lack of things happening, here’s a picture of the blogging-view.

We tried to make a go for it a couple of mornings ago and made it one-third of the way before the engine let us down. Making us having to sail into the night back to Dalarö. If the winds would go south we might have made it. But that’s not our luck.. not that the winds were strong in the other direction either. We had barely wind in the sails and moved in approximately 1 knot all the way back. When the wind left us drifting we had David, the other new guy onboard, paddle with a homemade paddle we made of a fender and a stick. David has proven to be a great asset onboard – making protein-rich meals and second Captain Simen with the engine. His history of years in the American army gave him, in addition to speaking arabic, the skill set we needed right now.

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David making sure we don’t crash.

It’s another day. We are trying again. Maybe we’ll get there tonight. Maybe not. But we know for sure that snow is coming. The next week, however, is supposed to be pretty warm.

Captain Jack

Harry Louella is afloat!

The full moon had just taken over the sky. It was luckily still some daylight to work with for this next critical step. Over the horizon we could make out the planet Mars as we lowered Harry Louella into the murky shipyard-water. There was this magical little moment as we watched our new pirate-ship float by itself for the first time in four years.

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Harry Louella making touchdown.

Earlier in the day we spent hours filling in the cracks in between the boards with a fitting substance. We had the ship lifted from its trailer in the water with the crane of the shipyards rig. In some strange way the trailer had got stuck on the wrong side of the metal boat ramp. This meant we couldn’t just drag the boat back on land – it had to be lifted. So we did. Hasse was nice enough to use his truck as a temporary working-platform for a few hours.

It was a dirty job that just had to be done. And man did it help! We are still on red alert and have to watch the water all the time. We thought there would be a lot more water right now, but it seems fine. Meaning; we only have the two installed bilge-pumps running constantly. The big electric pump we got the other day is set to start by itself if the water-level rises over a certain point. But for now it looks good. We are afloat!

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Harry Louellas last time on the trailer.

 

Now starts a whole new set of stuff to take care of onboard. We need to have another real go-through of the engine, easier said then done when none of us are really born as mechanic-wonderchilds, but I’m sure we can figure out the basics. We also have to install a wind-indicator, a weather-station and run another full check of the older than us-electrical system.

There is also a whole bunch of stuff to take care of regarding the FF Harry. In short – we need to figure out a solution on how to get rid of it in a respectable way. The same goes for the trailer and som excess gear we can’t take with us whenever we are ready to venture on. Then of course, there is the case of rigging the mast, checking the sails and probably learn how to use them.

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Captain Simen giving the tractor a hand.

Yes, there is tons of stuff to do. We have spent two weeks in Spillersboda now, and we are still looking at least on another week before we can be ready. But that is no problem, not when we can optimistically start this week off with our new home tied to the dock.

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Thank you for reading! I challenge you to share our blog on whatever social media you prefer. We would also like to remind you about our fundraiser. As you can imagine this project does not come cheap and we can really use all the help we can get to put this ship back in a respectable shape. If you have the chance, don’t hesitate about supporting us either with a small donation or by sharing our adventures with your friends and family.

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Captain Jack

 

We made the news!

Time is passing slower for every day we have to wait here in Spillersboda. There is nothing to complain about in this little pearl of a Swedish village – but we are ready to move on, to get this ship sailing and go treasure-hunting southward. There is of course great things happening all the time. Like today, my mother and brother is coming to visit all the way from the distant Norway and before I could wash my face this morning this guy knocked on the window inviting us to dinner next week. 

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Spillersbodas mainstreet.

When I say, ‘before I could wash my face’ (something I don’t usually do every morning) it probably should’ve happened today. You see, yesterday we went to Norrtälje to get an antenna for the new VHF we was gifted this week. And at the same time got a wind-indicator to put at the top of our mast before we put it up. But not stopping there, we got a weather-station and kept our promise of singing karaoke with people met last Wednesday. It seems that Wednesdays are our new Norrtälje-day. Anyways, before we could return safely to the shipyard, after having spent a whole day and night in society – we had some trouble with the wind in the pitch dark and crashed into the dock by accident.

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Damages caused by hitting the dock to hard.

Everything went well of course, not counting the Captains ending up in a brawl over spilt milk. Waiting for something to happen can’t be good for anyone – And let me assure you that although we all love each other, it is for the best if the new ship get’s floating as soon as possible. Apart from the fact that autumn is rapidly approaching, thereby also harder weather – we are still going for our goal of hitting the mediterranean by the time of new year.

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Pirate-lunch.

Also we happened to cover a whole page in the local newspaper yesterday. It seems like the swedes find it extremely interesting that we are stuck, waiting for our new pirate-ship to float. We too, of course, but like we talk to other sailors and previous sailors about – slipping, is the worst part of the cake. We had a reporter visiting us, her name was Britta, which of had been tipped off about pirates being in town. True stories are worth telling I suppose, which is the reason we couldn’t walk through town yesterday without being recognized by many.

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The article in Nortälje Tidning.

The ship is getting there. I don’t dare writing about when we will actually get to sail away from here, but my best guess is within october first. We’ll probably take the chance of lowering the ship another notch or two within the next few days. We did after all get a new pump yesterday, my hope is that we can cover most of the bottom with seawater as soon as possible. It just takes time – and we are no good at waiting.

Captain Jack

We bought a bilge-pump with cash!

Our ship is built in oak. A very hard but sturdy type of wood that takes forever to seal up. It has only been five days, but it seems like a lot longer since all we want to do is continue our journey south before it gets too cold. The last two days have been super windy so we tried to spend the time wisely by hitchhiking into the next town to buy a new bilge-pump. 

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FF Harry enjoyingtime to himself.

Sweden is a wonderful country in many ways. But there is this one thing we have discovered that will most likely and hopefully take this country down. They are slowly ruling out the good old cash-payment method. On more than one occation we have been stopped in our way just because we haven’t had the option of paying with a credit-card. We can’t even go to the bank to top up our accounts – because the banks don’t even accept cash.. what the heck is this? One thing is that this so called EU-country won’t accept Euro, but cash in general? Everything now has to be logged and even more of our freedom is being taken away from us. How and why would you ever want this for your country? Thank all gods that we’re leaving this country and are not Swedish.

That was my morning-rant. I get that way when I haven’t had my morning coffee yet. But seriously, how do the Swedes think this is gonna play out? We had to have the waitor pay our bill with his credit-card, while he got cash from us. I can easily smell how that bill was canceled from the register.

Norrtälje is a nice little city. It’s only about 15 kilometers from here and have absolutely everything you need to live the good life. We are of course very happy here in Spillersboda where they have the local grocery-store accepting cash and a nice small community – but Norrtälje is a city, and we wish we had a whole lot more money to spend on stuff we actually need for the new ship. Instead we spent the day walking around, checking out the stores and in the end got to know some of the local karaoke-singers. We might have promised to give them a show next wednesday.

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But we also got what we came for: a new bilge-pump to take care of 93 liters every single minute. This means that we most likely tomorrow morning will be ready to lift the ship up with a crane, use a tractor to remove the trailer it is now standing on and then lower it down till it sits on the keel and have three pumps taking care of the rivers flowing in trying to drown our engine. But this isn’t the sinking Swedish cash-economy. We will float, because that’s what Harry’s do – Harry Floats.

Captain Jack