Abandon ship!

When your pirate-ship is under attack, in waters toward warmer climates and undiscovered treasures, by enemies and dangers you can’t even imagine – All Captains onboard will have to work as the perfect team we are in order to make it south. 

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A normal sight onboard Harry Louella

A few days ago we were attacked by the gruesome Transition-monster about five nautical miles out from our current safe harbour. It came out of nowhere – probably as the natural result of our previous two sinkings last week in the harbour of Nynäshamn. We suddenly lost all power of the engine and had to rise the jib with what I would like to refer to as no-wind-whatsoever to sail ourselves into safe shore on an abandoned island.

After having been rescued for the third time on this amazing ship we got into Fyrudden harbour where we are currently located. After having checked and rechecked, gone through all of our scenarios we have collectively among the Captains given the order of abandon ship. Harry Louella is being towed from here to Gryts Varv in 24 hours where it will most likely be spending it’s time until someone in this world have the time to fix this relative simple problem, which we simply don’t have time for if we want to get south before winter arrives.

Dear reader, do not fear! We are not by any chance giving up. I must admit that we have kind of gotten of course the last few weeks and should by the plan have already entered the Kiel-kanal. But as the temperature is pushing for snow we are simply not taking any chances and have decided to skip a few chapters ahead head south on friday morning. Check in at next post to see where our adventures has taken us!

Captain Jack

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Problemsolving life

We are getting used to being stuck in random places. I suppose that’s a good thing since the only real plan we have is to get south and to get started on our ‘Pirates for peace-fundation’. It seems that our plan of sailing around the country of Portugal has changed – most likely we will be journeying through the canals of Europe until we hit the Mediterranean. The months we are entering simply don’t go well with us or Harry Louella entering the open water featuring the Atlantic ocean. 

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Entering harbour at night.

We are standing by in Öxelösund, a small industry town with not much going on east in Sweden. We’ve had to stop for some maintainance of our vessel. It was a planned stop, but it doesn’t seem like we’ll be moving for another day. Conny is working hard to repair our jib-sail that took a hit when were sailing against the wind a week ago. This is an easy fix but we have to put the hours into it.

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Conny our very own sailmaker putting in some hours.

Yesterday the fog was so thick that it would be straight out dangerous for us to go out through the waters we are now sailing. I doubt there is many places on earth with this many reefs and tiny islands. Today it is of course raining – making Conny’s sowing-job on deck a bit more uncomfortable. But we’ve got time.. The snow isn’t here yet and we still have to get the engine started.

It looks like we found the problem to why we kept losing the engine all the time. The diesel-filters were all clogged up. I mean for real clogged up. Totally black with cloggy clogging-materials built up through the years. Lucky for us we found a gas-station wich was more of a garage and they had in a dark corner of their storage only two filters left that would fit our engine. Of course the guy behind the counter warned us about getting air into the system and the mechanics, being Captain Simen and David, did their best. But this engine is old – and have a hard time being friendly to young pirates. It sucked in whatever air it could handle and here we are. Stranded once again – in a guest harbour of Sweden, forced to push a button every five-minute, hoping that the air will pass through the system.

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Here we are…

It’s not all bad of course. We finally got to wash our clothes and take showers ad lib. David holds the record of almost two hours in the showers. The guest-harbour is closed but we were lucky enough to get the codes and stuff from some other people who had been here earlier this year and can therefore enjoy the liberty of the good life of a washing-room and nice clean toilets.

Well, I have to get back to work. We have talked to a mechanic, the guy that sold us our new diesel-filters, and hopefully we can easily ease ourselves out of this within a couple of hours. If you by any chance have it in you to help us out in this increasingly costly journey feel free to use the paypal-button below or share our blog with some friends around the world!

Will keep you posted!

Captain Jack

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Pumping water in Spillersboda

It looks like the backend, the aft, of our new ship is starting to get used to be back in water. The pumps are now only pumping two thirds of the time. This is very good news. And even though there is days before she can be lifted of her trailer and float on her own, things are happening! Of course – We were about to burn down the whole boat last night, when an electrical fire broke out in the waterpump-pedal to our new bathroom sink. 

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Looking at Harry Louella from FF Harry.

I kinda wish we were back in the old days. When boats were built in this shipyard – and more people than the two of us and the shipyard-master, Hasse, is up bright and early like today. A long time before the sun comes up. It’s strange how the long days of painting, wiring, pumping and screwing makes one want to get up in the morning. It is amazing to totally trying to learn how all the previous owners have all put in at least one cable or fix idea on how to solve a problem onboard before us.

This place was built in 1919 and had it’s grand glorious days between the 1930’s and 50’s. Spillersboda, the village itself was first mentioned in history in the year 1535. In the 1970’s there was only one farm in Spillersboda, and tree others in the area. A man named Carl Fridolf Westerblom opened the first filial of a general-store here in 1888. A few years later, there was built a new store that still stands today. This shop is today kept alive by a nice lady named Anna and her husband, Ahmed, who is an pescetarian.

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Spillersboda general store, picture from their site; http://www.spillersbodalanthandel.se

There was also a sawmill started here in 1903, that is still today one of Spillersbodas biggest employers. Today there is 479 registered inhabitants of this little pearl of a place to visit. Because of the short distance to Stockholm, there is well over 1500 people that also use this place for recreation. Even though Ahmed says the numbers are BS, and that most people actually don’t live here most of the year – The population is on the rise and have gained well over a hundred souls since 2005. At least on paper.

Onboard the boats in our newly aqired fleet, we have gone through all of the important tasks needed to be done before having both ships float by themselves. Captain Simen spent a few hours and probably most of the bad words he have ever learned to pump out the old oil and change the oil-filter. We still have to make sure the other dieseltank will actually hold diesel, but I can’t imagine that both tanks are actually broken. The damage is most likely not caused by rust, but rather something caused by friction.

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Captain Simen changing the oilfilter.

The best part so far is to finally have a place to cook decent meals and a functioning cooling-box to keep the food fresh. We can finally eat stuff that doesn’t come out of a tube and use milk that isn’t made to last for two years. In short, things are going great and we are enjoying our peaceful days in sweet little Spillersboda.

There was of course this case of fire.. Because we are taking in a few hundred litres a minute, the waterlevel rose a little too much, but lucky for all of us – we were there, and quick response from a well emergency-trained crew fixed the problem in a swoop.

Captain Jack

Surviving abnormal hot days

Data recording weather conditions in our current whereabouts this time of the year is clear; The temperature since arrival in this beautiful landscape of Sweden is, and will for the foreseeable future be, 10 degrees warmer than the average of the last 10 years. This, of course, is just the way we are heading. April of 2018 was the 400th month in a row on planet earth with record high temperatures – and the cat really hates it.

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Simba finally standing still for a photograph

Lucky for him, most of the time – he’s a night hunter.  As soon as the sun disappears the temperature is cooling down to something somewhat more normal and I suppose more liveable for kitty-cats. Us, we are doing fine. Our camp nowadays gets some nice morning sun before whatever is left of trees from the beaver went to work, gives us shade all day long until the mild evening rays come along, bringing a couple of hours questionable heat before sunset.

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Justin Beaver has been busy doing his birch-thing.

Days fly by. We have no idea how the cold months of last winter could move slower than global warming in the 80’s and now we’re a week away from June (and total collapse). But there are some upsides to all this good weather – The plants are thriving! Our newly pirate-planted fields of vegetables, greens and not to forget the herbs are getting ready to explode into a firework of fresh organic edibles. Maybe not just yet… But sooner than expected and despite the end of the world and all that – in the short run, this is perfect.

Harry’s engine is loving the fresh-water. The wood, not so much. There is no rush but within the end of this year, he would probably like very much to dry-dock just a little bit. He could use a fresh layer of paint, oil, and other liquids. It seems like the previous Captain has been taking care just as much as needed. But the ship is old, only three years away from turning forty – Much more than you can expect from modern cruise-liners.

There are tons of other people using the lake, which of course is wonderful! We’ve seen dozens of Germans doing their canoe-thing, families are starting to spruce up their cabins for a new (record-warm) season, the locals have launched their flat-bottom fishing-dinghies and we’ve met our first new friends on this journey; two brothers from France. The older one (65) a highly educated medicine man quit his job years ago to work within holistic medicine and the younger one (61) is doing a canoe-trip of northern Scandinavia to figure out whether he will stay in Europe or return to India where he had been living for the past 35 year-ish or so.

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FF Harry resting after 3 hours of full sun

As you might’ve guessed. We’re back in Tøcksfors to divert some electricity. We are of course looking into other more wannabe-legal ways to charge our batteries, but we were powerless, broke and also we wanted to abduct some old tires to protect FF Harry from scratches back in camp. We’ll return to camp (and to have another amazing feast with our new French friends) tomorrow. Mission completed.