The waiting-game

Getting old wooden pirate-ships to float takes all the patience in the world – and at least a week. Lucky for us, there is plenty of work to be done around the ship. Time fly by even if we are desperate to get her sailing. Captain Simen has been working hard to make sure the engine and all the electric cabeling is top-notch. I, myself, have mostly been taking care of the paint-jobs and neccesary detail-tasks. 

IMG_0742
Here is a before-picture, taken last time she was seaborne.

There’s a fine line to how much we want to put the ship in the watet at once. Most important is to make sure the engine stays above water, which we have managed so far. At the moment we are mostly conserned about if the trailer can handle all the weight of a sinking ship at the back end. It would totally be best for all if we could get it further out as soon as possible. There is a chance that the whole trailer will brake.. Not good.

A friend we met earlier in Göta kanal came by today with 12 liters of engine oil. A perfect gift at the perfect time. 400 euro worth of oil is something we didn’t think of untill today. It would be kind of stupid to continue on without changing oil. I thought diesel was expensive, but oil is way, way harder on our accounts. Thank you, Jan!

dav
One handlebar painted.

If you also feel like helping out somehow, you are more than welcome. There isn’t really room for any more hands on deck at this time (we get several requests from aspiring pirates out there, but at this time it would just be more people waiting in the shipyard) But soon, good people. Soon soon soon… If you do however have spare cash, diesel, a GPS, echo sounder (or whatever it is called in english) or knowledge about wood, bedford-engines or this exact ship, feel free to contact us HERE or check out our fundraiser HERE.

We wish we could be sailing right now. The wind and the sun is just perfect and even though tomorrow is supposed to bring rain – it would be an adventure to rise our sail for the first time. But first things first, let’s make the ship seaworthy. And on the positive side; we are not taling in as much water as last night.

fbt
Me looking into the camera with the ship in the background.

Yesterday, we had a visit from the people we bought the ship from. They brought beer all the way from Åland and a contract for us to sign. Great people that was really sad about letting the boat go before they even had the chance to try her out. But the fact is: it takes a lot of time, love and patience to get her back in the water. Something none of the tree previous owners had, one way or the other. We are getting there. I just hate the wait.

Captain Jack

Advertisements

The new pirate-ship

The fog is cold and wet, it makes getting up in the morning only bearable with hot coffee and the feel of the morning sun creeping over the top of the trees. Everything is damp and soggy – But there is no sleeping in for pirates that has to get their new ship ready for adventures. 

IMG_20180904_081311.jpg
Morning sun.

It took us a couple of days to decide about the ship after arrival in Spillersboda. The town is quiet now that most of the summer-guests have gone back to Stockholm or wherever. But there is still a grocery-store, a hardware and woodshop, not to forget the shipyard we are currently located at. It took almost two days to go through the state of the vessel, but it is verified; the engine starts, the ship from 1957 is in good shape, it looks amazing – we bought it.

There is of course a maze of things to take care of even before we can get her on the water. The most important thing was that the engine would start and with a little help from Hasse, the man of the shipyard, we managed to put together the information needed for us to turn the key. None of us is actual mechanics, and there is a total mess of cables, pipes and stuff noone actually know why is there. The ship has been on land for the last 4 years. Lucky for us the people before us have been taking good care of it, and we remain very positive about getting her seaworthy. It looks like we might have to stay in Spillesboda for a couple of weeks to make it happen, but it’s totally worth it. The ship is beautiful!

IMG_20180902_140755.jpg
Wrapped pirate ship.

This would not be possible without the help from all of you that have donated to our fundraiser. The new pirate-ship is still on a lease-contract, meaning that if you are able to help us out, there is still a chance! Every little krone, euro, dollar or whatever your country have decided is good enough for your people is very much appreciated. Please, don’t feel bad about donating to our ship-cause. It is allready in our hands, but not fully paid for, and the actual fixing up of the ship shouldn’t cost much more than hard labour from the crew. We really want to keep telling you about our adventures – please support our campain by following the link below.

LINK

IMG_20180902_161855.jpg
Under the tarp.

I should get going, there is way too much to do and I’ve allready finnished my coffee. First point of the agenda is to unwrap the rest of our new ship. I can’t wait to see the whole thing without wrapping – and to show all you good readers of the blog, and all contributors what we’ve got to work with in the future! I’ll make sure to update you all as soon as possible.

Captain Jack

An all Norwegian boat

Moving onto a boat of 23 feet will never be an easy task when used to the comfort of showers, toilet, full kitchen, laundry-possibilities and so on. Just imagine trying to push all your belongings in a just a couple of boxes. then mashing these boxes down in the hull while making yourself believe that it should be as easy as THAT to get your stuff back up later.

Now – our boat was not that roomy when we got it. Especially on the inside. It soon became clear that we had to evolve this beast into something a little more of a mix between savage and comfortable. At the same time; more suitable for our ambition of living outside until King Winter or other climatic complications shut us down. More about our journey later, this post will be dedicated to our new home and proud ship – never before and soon to be christened – “FF HARRY”.

The Original

The boat was built in 1981, presumably on Onsøy, a peninsula and municipality that in 1968 merged with Fredrikstad. There is sadly little to no more information about the build or the builder. The materials used in the original is Norwegian wood wrapped around the iron engine-bars and aluminium top. We know that a large number of boats are built in Fredrikstad throughout time and therefore we credit our beautiful ship to the boat-builders from this part of the world.

The engine is a classic! I can’t find the exact year of this particular make, but was kicked to life by Damsgård Motorfabrikk  later named Sabb Motor established in Laksevåg, just outside Bergen in 1925. They first produced our engine in 1958. At the time; a four stroke 8 Hp, one cylinder diesel that later got upgraded to an 10 HP. They also made a bigger version; an 22 HP. Total make of the engines are about 20.000, and the makers are still in business! Even though the last engine at the factory was produced in 2001.

SABB-motor.jpg
ORIGINAL PROTOTYPE, BEFORE THEY ADDED SERIAL NUMBERS – Picture from Wikipedia: Av self – Eget verk, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2575431

Necessary Mods

We had to make it our own. I can already smell the frustrated pirates lurking the marinas putting bad words to the new look of our proud ship. Understandable but luckily we are mostly carefree. The high culture of preserving the old and (must I say) awesome historical architecture of nautical wessels is very strong around the world. As should it be. Therefore we took our important steps not to damage the original structures while making our changes. Minus a couple of cuts and blisters it shouldn’t take more than about 45 minutes, two screws and some lifting to turn it back to it’s fainting glory.

sdr

First we wanted more indoor space, we also wanted the ability to stand up. The amazing feeling of sitting aft navigating the sunset is romantic but sometimes very cold. Especially at night, bad weather or dirty rain. Besides – with our new addition to the boat it would be nearly impossible to keep a free sight of the water. The steering had to be moved – or we could dramatically die in a crash with an amazing superyacht – blinded by or own creativity..

The engine works for now. The starter does however not. We have to manually start the machinery. The dynamo is out too, meaning we don’t really have any way to make electricity. Bummer. Our solution was to get another battery and eventually we will buy a charger. For now we have borrowed the one of our Mister Fixit neighbor. Then there was all the other equipment.. Safety-stuff, ropes, oil, paint, diesel, lamps, heater and… of course new curtains.

IMG_20180504_101952.jpg IMG_20180504_102021.jpg

The previous owner made a box inside. He was also nice enough to leave us with something to sleep on. The electrical control board and wiring was outdated and we needed at least one new bilge-pump. The originally installed hand-pump seemed to only work if somebody used it.. There was no installed lights except from the port and starboard lanterns. A couple of the wooden boards were rotten, but nothing serious. We removed one of the benches outside which in turn gave room for our new cockpit.

A couple of chairs from a dinner table-set, some more free materials and parts from the internet, countless trips to a diverse selection of shops and boutiques, a couple of rounds with beer and a little help with painting from friends – and voila! You’ve got our boat!

IMG_20180504_102432.jpg

That was about what we have of story on “FF Harry” for now. We still have another full day of work on the boat. Then we’ll be free and happy go lucky! Depending on our ability to convince Simba, the cat, that boating can be a lot of fun.

Feel free to follow this blog. We’ll do our best to keep you in the loop!
Jack