Expedition: Complete

We have arrived at our latitude, 70 degrees North. We do have another short day tomorrow, but that is basically just crossing the fjord in time for low tide. Since the tide around these northern waters during full moon easily vary about tree meters we have to be there at low tide in order to unload the ship without running the risk of get stuck until the next full moon tide next month. There is no dock at our destination we will have to anchor outside our new home at Arctic Fjordcamp.

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We spent a resting day in Tromsø. It was nice to collect the energy needed for the last haul. The captains got almost 24 hours alone onboard before we had a crew-mate join us for the last couple days of sail. Captain Simen’s little brother, Marius, who also traveled with us on the FF Harry and later visited us in Malta had decided to join for the last days.

From Tromsø we sailed for ten hours and we have now plugged into our last guest harbour for this expedition. The choice fell on Skjervøy, about 20 nautical miles from our goal and final stop for now; Storeng, Burfjord. It will take a while to soak up all experience from this sail. Our trip-counter is currently 1620 nautical since Fredrikstad and about 2850 in total since we left Västerås. That’s about 5300 kilometers sailed, a quarter of the distance between the north and south pole.

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So far I’m impressed by the landscape we are moving into. Tall great mountains, plenty of fjords, and snow that could easily serve an entire winter Olympics for decades to come. I must admit it felt a bit sad to sail away from the blooming spring in the south a few weeks back but sooner or later I’m sure it will follow us here as well.

All that remain is to thank all of you readers for following us through this amazing experience. This blog is officially taking a brake, awaiting new and crazy adventures to come. I’m sure you will find hours of text from earlier blogs. Thanks again, it has been fun.

Until next time, sail safe and enjoy the small things in life.

Signing off,
Captain Jack

Anchoring in Trollfjord

It’s snowing again. Hard and relentless. But it’s okay cause we are in the magical land of Lofoten and Vesterålen where the mountains are heavily surrounding our boat at any time. Like a tall amazing backdrop that stretch for the sky – we just had to explore this further, so we did! But first we had a nice long break-day in the city of Svolvær. The journey ahead wasn’t very long, but our goal was set, we headed for the even more magical place of Trollfjord. 

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On our way we streamed our voyage live on twitch. Because of this we sailed much slower than we would otherwise. But had a whole bunch of fun on our way! Lucky as we are the sun followed us most of the way and a bunch of people got to corona-watch our journey for a few hours.

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In the tourist season many big ships go here. It’s a tiny fjord on the fjord-scale but hot damn is it nice. As you enter you are imitatively swallowed by tall and taller mountain on each side. The side of the mountain go straight up and this time of the year big ships are prohibited entrance due to heavy rock-slides. We made a slow but certain entrance ourselves by pushing aside flakes of ice, screaming for echoes and flashing boobs to the trolls living in the valleys within.

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We had decided to spend the night. Although the fjord doesn’t offer much of places to anchor or any electricity for our frozen bodies despite being home to an entire power-station that steal away plenty of the charm by being exceptionally loud all day and night long. In the south end however there was a place and it was perfect for spending the night. We dropped anchor and for the first time ever the Goddess had a real anchor-beer to celebrate.

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It was then time to slay our fish. Another first for the Goddess. She had slayed fish before but nothing as big as this one. After hacking her way through the large bones it was cooked and eaten along with potato, carrots with an overload of melted butter. We are after all in the waters of fishing season numero uno in Norway, the Skrei is in town. After a meal like this any healthy sailor will fall to pieces if they don’t go visit lala-land shortly after, and since we didn’t have any heat to speak of except the flame from the stove, we did.

The next morning we got a start on the engine pretty fast. It was time to leave the Trolls behind and set course for “the blue city” of Sortland. To get there we had to pass through Trangstrømmen, which translate to ‘the narrow current’ and in order to make it through we had to hit the tide as the current was going North. And we did just in time, good thing we didn’t sleep in further. The alternative would have made for an extremely slow passage.

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In Sortland the Goddess invested in kebabs for the crew before she ran of to buy some new warm underwear. Not long after, we were off to cross the fjord to Maurnes were they supposedly had a better guest harbour. Captain Simen spent the time watering down the deck with salt water to melt the snow. Little did we know that a storm ha taken out the electricity but we made ourselves feel at home by borrowing a private dock and settled in for the night.

Captain Jack

Sailing in Lofoten

We’ve had the most amazing crossing over Vestfjorden, the fjord between the mainland and famous Lofoten. For the first day in weeks and right after a night filled with harsh winds from the North we woke up to a sunny morning, close to no wind and the most silent water I’ve seen since the port of Trondheim. We were in the middle of a larger storm-system but only idiots wouldn’t make use of a whole day of blue skies to Explorer some of the most stunning nature the kingdom of Norway has to offer.

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First we tried to tank up in Hellsundnes, but of some reason they had removed the automate for paying so we had to resort to our very last dunk of diesel. We truly haven’t been this low since leaving Fredrikstad way back in February. Shit let go, we filled her up and sat course West toward the City of Svolvær.

The cruising across was a day to remember. We saw some great sea eagles, and tons of other big birds, the small islands and reefs made up the first couple of hours before we surfed on lazy waves across the fjord, enjoying a warm cup of coffee as our destinations grew lager in front of us. Of course, this was the perfect opportunity for the Goddess to take her topless picture – flashing all of Lofoten in one go.

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Now, Svolvær is a pretty popular place for travelers whenever there is no corona-virus going on, but so is Bergen and Stockholm, and none of these big cities charge as much for a night as the guest harbour of Svolvær. I won’t even tell you the price in case you end up in an anaphylectic shock.

The city itself was as quiet as the rest of the world this time of life but back in Mandal we met this bartender that knew a guy living here and how can you not follow up on such a lead. By the help of social media I had tracked the guy down weeks ago and invited him over for a beer. He arrived just as we had finished our meal of potatoes in souse with economy fishcakes made by the Goddess. It turned out to be a great welcome from a guy actually born and escaped from Fredrikstad years ago. It’s a small world.

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Other than this, we stayed an extra day yet another time to get a bit bored onboard. The first morning I made my way over to the harbour office and purchased tree gold coins, buying us each seven minutes of hot water. Nice and clean for the first time in a while we could lean back an relax for a while.

A neighbor fisherman knocked on the boat and asked for some help to thread a cable. I willingly got dressed and five minutes later I took home a huge kod in reward. This will be a nice little future meal for the crew.

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Tomorrow we’ll be leaving. But first the tanks will have to be bunkered and we will be on our way toward Tromsø. I believe we have picked the nicest route there. It will take an extra couple of days, but this is also one of the most amazing parts of the adventure.

Captain Jack

Make the most of it

Aside from all the amazing experiences life on a boat gives you – there are basically two types of days onboard. Of course there are variations of all sorts like crew, location, mood or weather. Being liveaboards on a sailboat is probably still the best thing I’ve ever done. Ever. As we only have a few weeks left of this two and a half year adventure, or to divide it further; since packing our bags and leaving our shitty apartment on Malta, the time has come to start contemplating. In a few weeks we will likely be back on solid ground for who knows how long, and I can’t help but to feel a bit uneasy about it.

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A minor storm, hopefully the last one of the winter, is raging outside. It woke me up at six this morning. Of course, this is something you will get coming when sailing arctic waters in the cold season and we have been prepared for this. It does however slow us down and present us with some extra days at port. Except from being a bit more costly due to our hang to cook interesting meals and maybe even get a beer or two, we are far more tied to the boat because of the shitty weather and the ongoing pandemic.

Along our way, since we acquired our first boat a few years back we’ve had plenty of different people traveling with us. Putting the right people together is essential and not everyone turned out to be right ones for us. We believe in giving people chances, some was fit for a while, others not at all. Some I will always welcome back. To live and travel on a boat you need to be open, true and honest. You need to give your crew-mates the space they need and be respectful to all the differences. You better also have the ability to forgive, laugh and play. The hardest crew we’ve had to work with is those who have not been pulling their weight. Onboard with us we try not to order people around, but want each crew to find their own tasks and in that way find their place. There are always things to be done and unless you have been in situations like this before you better get settled fast.

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I imagine it hasn’t always been easy for our recruits to find their place. Since we already have our routines and tasks in automatic place, the only thing they could do in the beginning was to follow orders. Because – even though we let the democracy have it’s say, that’s not really how it works. On a ship there is a hierarchy where the Captain have the final word – And this boat have two.

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The tasks comes down to a few very important things. There is the planning of the route, stops and destinations. We have navigation, weather, fuel and maintainance-planning. We need to think about safety, food, storage, cleaning, crew-scheduling, budget, health and electricity. Many of the things that on land fall into place pretty naturally, changes everyday onboard a boat.

Still I would think we have been very lucky with the people we have brought onboard. And I believe that most have been having a great time, just like us. Travelers are after all usually up for the action. Friends have become better friends and new friendships have been made. We can’t forget the reason for our choice to sail in the beginning; We wanted to travel. Both Captain’s have great experience on the subject, but we have usually been tied to our backpacks. After years of backpacking I suppose most travelers would be looking for a door to close behind them, not just the zipper of a tent. The urge to travel is still there, but in order to get anything out of it you need to get your rest, to have the time to take a brake.

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Imagine yourself traveling constantly for ten years of your life, but not had a good chance to step back and reflect over your experiences. Ten years of life is a long time to contemplate in one sitting. I would think that such a situation could put any healthy mind into depression. Many a traveler before us have trapped themselves in a loop of traveling for too long, where stepping out of it can brake a person or damage the soul. I’ve met many such people and they are no longer happy, they’ve lost touch of sort. In order to travel for real you also need to pull it together once it’s over. When traveling like we do however, although you still have to think through the experience as a whole when it ends, the defragmentation is done as you go. I truly believe that on long adventures such as this, you will benefit much more by travelling slowly. It’s important to remember that any journey, no matter how long, eventually comes to an end.

Back to our different types of days onboard. The first one being the days we are on the move. Our sailing days. I wake up bright and early and get the coffee going. Now as we are three onboard, the Goddess also get up and we have a quick snack and get going. The days route was planned the night before so it’s easy to just smack on the electronics, start the plotter, start the engine and leave the dock. Captain Simen need to sleep a bit longer in order to function so he’ll take the next shift. Then there is the morning shit-chat over the coffee or me talking to the seagulls when we are two-handed. Depending on wind we try to sail as much as possible but we can’t get around a pretty hard use of the engine as long as we have a goal in the end. As the day go on we are enjoying the mountains, fjords, birds and more coffee.

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When it’s time for lunch, Captain Simen is usually up and we eat in turns. This way everyone can get some time inside where it’s much warmer and in case of rain you can get changed and dry off. Unless there is something special going on, we plan to spend about 6-8 hours on the water. That gives us another 30 nautical miles or so under our belts. Once again we take our sailing suits off and go inside to heat up and maybe have another snack. Then there is time for exploring if the weather is good, showers if the marina is open (which it rarely is due to the pandemic) or, if it has been a hard day – pure relaxation.

Then there is time to fix things on the boat, do some shopping and prepare for dinner. To wind off we can watch a movie or a show, play a game or read a book. We have to plan the route for the next day but sooner or later it’s time for bed.

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The second type of days is the the ones at port or resting days. In these instances it is mostly due to weather. We have a certain limit for how much wind we like to sail in. Many of these days we would still go out if we could sit inside to steer or I guess, if it was summer. We don’t care too much about light rain or snow, but when the wind hits more than 10 meter/second, it’s raining or snowing hard and when the waves surpass 3 meters in height we find it more comfortable to wait. Today is such a day.

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Some days we have some work to do, either online or on the boat. Many times the weather is not so bad in port even though it’s raging outside so we often have the chance to explore or go for walks. Usually there is an internet-connection that let us watch series, movies, play games or just plain out go online exploring. It’s alright to have these days once in a while, but if there is more than one in a row things tend to tense up. If the reason for our stop was purely because we wanted, I guess it would be different, but the case is that this usually happen because there is no reason to be outdoors. It get’s good old boring, very fast.

The variations of our days are as everywhere else endless. But the basics are the same. A good cup of coffee in the morning, some type of action during the day, at least one home-cooked meal, some entertainment and sleep. All I can think I would want different was a better mattress. The one we have is typical boat – foamy, way too thin and not really made for long time use. But it’s way better than sleeping in a tent, it’s the price I have to pay. Especially since I no longer have to carry all my stuff in a backpack every morning.

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Everyone should travel. Everyone should have the experience in life of exploring culture and to see how close but different our cultures actually are to each other. I cannot stress enough how important I believe it is to actually feel this difference. There are people in this world that never leave their village, people that never get to discover anything outside their country. But how are you supposed to make sense of a world you only know from a distance? I’m not sure if I believe that seeing is believing, but to recognize that what you get presented as the true world through a screen in your living room – is only a part of the whole picture. It’s not necessarily wrong or fake news, but a picture that do not satisfy all of your senses, instead it gives your brain a chance to fabricate the rest of the story (like human brains like to do) and this will never give you the full picture of the world you are part of. In order to really understand – you have to get out there. To feel and to understand that you are in symbiosis with it all.

Going ashore in a few weeks will be another adventure. It’s been a long time since I had to consider everyday-things and that will be an adjustment. It is however something I know I can handle. Even though I’m moving to a part of the world where I have never had any roots, that’s nothing new either. I and all of you are very able to adapt remarkably to any moves or changes. My experience make me sure that I have nothing to fear. Changes may feel unsafe or scary, but they don’t have to be. We are humans and our instinct for survival is extremely well developed. Sometimes we just have to be pushed over the edge to realize it.

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It’s not over yet. Let the storms come. It’s time for breakfast. I’ll take a slice of week old bread with egg. Sunny side up. And coffee.

Captain Jack

Self-Quarantined

The Norwegian winter is acting up again. Once again we have been forced to take a brake-day due to extreme rain. The forecast for today is 44 mm rain and a moderate gale from southeast. Even though we could probably press through, we have decided not to for the sake of the Goddess and the ship. This nasty weather is supposed to continue for a few days longer, but we are crossing our fingers that we’ll be able to make a move within a day or two. We are after all not going out to open water for a while. Then there is this pandemic going on, also making things a bit more difficult. We are very much in one of the safest places anyone can be, but it is proving hard to find both showers, bathrooms and specific stores. Lucky for us, we are a great crew together and enjoy good food, homey evenings and time to read. On Captain’s order we are self-quarantined and are avoiding contact with humans. 

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After leaving the magical island we had a long nice sail to Brønnøysund. On the way there we sailed pass “Torghatten” a mountain and beloved tourist-treasure known for it’s specific shape. We passed on the east side and from here it is hard to get a good picture, but I have found you a stock-photo for show.

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The city of Brønnøysund is exactly in the middle of the kingdom. 840 kilometer from each cape. We had a chance to visit the mall by the dock and get some supplies. With bags full of food, beer and a brand new board-game we settled in for a nice Saturday evening onboard. Next day we slept in, and this combined with not the best of weathers made us decide to stay an extra day. Taking extra days in towns and cities these corona-times totally sucks since there is absolutely nothing to do except taking strolls and walking big circles around other people.

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On our last passage between Brønnøysund and Sandnessjøen, where we are currently docked, we had a few minor setbacks. A sudden gust had our mainsail kiss the waves to the panicked screams from the Goddess steering the vessel. Although nothing was broken, except maybe a bit of the Goddess’s confidence, we suffered the loss of our newly acquired red ten meter mooring rope. With both sails hoisted, no engine started, and the weather acting up we risked far more danger than a rope is worth and decided the rope had to be an offer to the sea.

No more than half an hour later another gust triggered another scream from the Goddess, and another kiss of the waves – but sadly we were not that lucky. By this time had however lowered our main and was only sailing the foresail, but in return the foresail ripped apart from the headstay and a lose foresail in hard gust can potentially break your mast. It didn’t go that far, but the Windex on top of the mast snapped right off as the mast was brutally taking some major twitches before Captain Simen could get his safety-clip on, attach it to the fairlead and climb toward the bow to pull down the sail. In this crazy mayhem onboard we somehow also managed to break one of the windows in our sprayhood, but this was a quick but not so beautiful fix done as soon as we arrived in Sandnessjøen harbour.

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We also retreaded the foresail and made our way to yet another mall where the Goddess got to spend some money for food and necessaries. Tired from a long and partly stressful sail we took an early evening after a very enjoyable burger and independent studies.

Yesterday we passed the 66 degree North mark – only 4 to go. A couple of more days sailing and we’ll be in Bodø. Whenever these rainy days have passed we are looking to see some really nice days of the sunny Lofoten.

Captain Jack

Sailing the Norwegian fjords

Having spent a couple of days in rainy Bergen we were ready to keep sailing. We still have a pretty good distance to cover and city-life was never been good for any of us. As Captain Simen slept in I hoisted the sails and broke the ship record for speed. Only using the foresail we did 8,4 knots and it felt amazing. Although we are somewhat heavy with all our stuff onboard, good old Ella moves smooth through the water even when there is some crashing waves around. I wonder if our beloved ship and home have been looking forward to this next part of the journey to 70 degrees north. 

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It’s superhard to take good pictures of the mountains, the size is crazy. In the far right corner you can see a small white speck – it’s a house.

Sailing in the fjords is something drastically different from the open water. Here the waves are kept to a minimum by the surrounding mountains and the finds get pushed pushed between them. Even the small breezes we have encountered this far are giving us good speed every day. This said, we have also been burning some diesel to keep up with our goal of keeping to at least 4 knots an hour. This again has led to us now averaging about 5 knots and this is the exact spot where Ella is breaking through and we get the great feeling of sailing for real.

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Time fly by. It has been a few days since I got to post due to a heavy lack of internet. This also makes navigating a bit tricky since it takes forever to load the maps we need to locate the reefs and shallows. We have crossed Sognefjorden, the longest fjord in the world, before this we stayed over in Fonnes, right by Kaland and then the next day in Askvoll. These are huge distances to cover using our standard. Today we crossed Nordfjord and are staying in Måløy where we are preparing the ship for one of the passages we have been most worried about. Tomorrow we will sail passed Stadt. This are is famous for it’s bad and extreme conditions. The waves here are deemed dangerous and any sailor should sail with care.

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Enjoying nice, warm and sunny days. 

For once though, it seems that the weather-gods are on our side. The last few days including the forecast for tomorrow has been amazing. This is partly what has allowed us to travel these great distances. Before breakfast tomorrow we will reach 62 degrees north, leaving us only 8 degrees to sail. Also it’s only about an hour till we are back on the open Norwegian Sea. Everything on deck is tied down and extra secured. The forecast is only about 2 meter waves and a nice slow wind of 4-6 meters a second, but you never know this time of the year.

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I think we’ll have to take a longer break soon, cause last I heard it has snowed something like two meter at our final destination. Also it’s supposedly cold and still a bit dark. And I’m not really sure if I’m ready to leave summer down here yet. But first things first, we are likely to hit Ålesund this weekend and then Trondheim early next week. And after this the amazing Lofoten is awaiting us. Every day now is a great adventure, let’s see what tomorrow brings.

Captain Jack

Playing in the North Sea

Captain Simen was sleeping in as usual as I started out from Haugesund. Little did I know that the little passage in open water straight in  from the North sea would act up hard this early morning. But it certainly did, and for two hours I had my hands full while Simen was tossed between the walls in the cabin. It was rocking pretty bad until I finally was set in a position where I was able to hoist the sail to gain some stability onboard. As the waves came crashing one after the other we made a steady 8 knot ahead with only the foresail hoisted. It was totally amazing and at the end of the run I could see a rainbow pointing the way I myself was fighting to keep the snow out of my eyes and the ship away from the thundering shore on the starboard side. 

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First we sailed from Egersund to Tananger. We have, as you might understand, been getting pretty sick of waiting for storm-systems to pass and was eager to get some miles behind us. Tananger didn’t have much to offer as we moored. I suppose this is one of the places most people go in the summer or to work on the shipyards (or whatever they are) covering the entire bay. Once again we were of course lucky to arrive just as the snow came whisking into our faces.

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The bridge in Haugesund.

In general I think the gods must be following this blog, cause they tend to make sure that we are safely tied to a pier before the skies open the daily waterfalls. Luckily February is over tomorrow, noting that this of course is a leap-year, and we are getting very close to spring. As we passed the Stavanger fjord however we finally hit snow. We are officially in waters where the snow is licking the salty waters of the ocean. Our wishes to reach green bushes and blooming hills are still a couple of months away and the truth may be that we have picked the wrong time of the year to experience these things along the Norwegian coast.

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The favala outside Bergen.

After spending a night in Tananger we made a huge leap. 54 nautical miles in 10 hours. It was great to do some sailing in the dark again. It gives me a special feeling to navigate by the lights. In some strange way, at least here down south I feel much more comfortable maneuvering the waters based on light-signals. this way I always know exactly where we are and there is little to no room for mistakes. At the end of the day we found a quiet little harbour in Klokkarvik that sadly had no electricity for us to heat our frozen bodies. We went to bed early.

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Next morning, still frozen I started the engine and sailed off in some great shine from the sun. From Klokkarvik there was only about 2,5 hours to Bergen and it was done in a coffee. In Bergen they had electricity. And rain. And snow. Shitty weather as always and a wind that made us walk in thirty degree angles. Can’t expect anything else from the only city in Norway with more days of rain than anything else. But! It’s the end of the month, it’s Saturday and it’s the first extra day of the decade. I’m off to celebrate!

Captain Jack

The storms left us alone

For the first time since we left Fredrikstad, it looks like the storms have given us a chance to make some real progress. Leaving Mandal felt great, but we didn’t get further up the coast than Farsund before the winds once again locked us in for a few days. We have been getting pretty good at playing the waiting-game and have once again survived a lock-down without developing too harsh of an cabin-fever. We are now working our way toward next big port of call and Norway’s second largest city – Bergen, sometime this week. 

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The fairly short sail to Farsund was a smooth one. We did of course not have any wind to sail in so once again we ended up motoring the whole way. It was a beautiful journey in some of the exact landscape that make thousands of people spend their summers here every year.

Farsund itself was pretty much closed down for the season. But they did have a free guest harbour, however it took us a while to find some electricity. After some walking around and a couple of phone calls to the right officials we found a spot in the local fishing harbour. We then took some time to do a few fixes on the boat before having a nice meal and went to bed. This was to be our home for the next tree days. I think I personally completed two entire series on Netflix while the other Captain did whatever he was doing on the PlayStation.

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Before leaving Farsund we had a pizza-dinner the night ahead. This made sure we got a good night sleep and didn’t have to do any dishes. Something we found fitting since Captain Simen had just finished his two day project of cleaning all our stuff. The only thing we didn’t do was the laundry, but we sailed ahead bright and early next morning aiming to make this happen as soon as possible.

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The morning came when we could finally venture on. Unsure of the weather on open water we didn’t plan to go too far the first day. 22 Nautical miles later we had found a little guest harbour in Kirkehamn which by the way literally means Church Harbour. This small little fishing village is home to about 120 residents and to our great amazement they had both free showers and a free guest harbour. We did however pay to use their laundromat, but this was a much needed investment. Kirkehamn was a quiet little place but if you’re into gaming – you may remember the place being mentioned in Red Dead Redemption 2 as a village where a mother and child was murdered. How much truth there is to the story is something I haven’t dug into. As for us the place was a quiet little harbour with no internet what so ever. It was the time to take a warm shower and find a new book to read. Luckily our library still has plenty of stuff I haven’t even looked at yet.

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The article from the game, in Norwegian.

Next morning, actually it was almost midday, we continued north. As this particular stretch of Norway offer few places to stay and has no cover from the harsh weather in the Norwegian Sea we have planned it out so we can sail for about 6-9 hours a day and in a couple of days from now reach the city of Haugesund. Sorry Stavanger, but we will be skipping you this time around.

Today we had some great wind and finally got to hoist our sail. We did an average of 5 knots all day long and even though I called the sea rescue this morning to check on the weather and they said it would be stormy, we didn’t see a speck of it. We had pretty much calm seas and good winds the whole crossing. At the moment we are safe in Egersund, here we’ll take a slow and early evening before the long stretch to Tananger tomorrow.

Captain Jack

 

Between storms

Since Elsa – last weeks storm, took out our weather station completely I won’t be able to tell you exactly how bad it got this weekend. It wasn’t too bad and we enjoyed a couple of days getting to know Mandal. Not the biggest of towns but it left us with a good vibe and some great human interactions. We went out and had pizza for Valentines Day spending the last of the budget for the week. Right as the storm came swooping in, another northbound boat docked next to us. Also we had company from a local sailor awaiting good weather to cross Skagerak over to Denmark and ultimately down to the canary islands. 

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The couple’s ship came from Tjøme, just across the Oslo-fjord from where we started out. They had sat course for Svalbard, but where sailing in good time. Meaning they are planning to spend vacations and holidays until they reach northern Norway.

The weather makes it hard for us to plan ahead. After we spent a couple of days in Mandal we finally had one good day of sun and little wind. We used this little pocket filled with amazing sun to sail passed Lindesnes, and get started on our journey north. We have officially passed the most southern coordinates and the spirit onboard is high.

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Passing Lindesnes Lighthouse

Then the gods decided it was time for some more heavy rain and even a bit of snow. We are once again awaiting some more sailable elements to take us over the next couple of days which also include the only non-protected waters until we hit Stadt, much further north. As long as we can get our asses passed Stavanger, we’ll have protection from fjords and islands to press on – even with some nasty winds or precipitation.

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For now we are docked in Farsund. This is a smaller town than Mandal with less than ten thousand people. Their guest harbour is closed for the season, so we didn’t have to pay but this also ruined our plans of getting some laundry done. We spent some time figuring out the electrics, cause they seem to have closed it down due to a technical error somewhere. A phone-call to some officials fixed the problem and we are now able to make all the waiting-coffee we can drink.

Captain Simen took on him to seal the exposed steel Elsa did to our hull. We then made a quick fix by spraying the area with some simple white color and hope this will hold until we eventually get the boat in dry dock this summer. At least it should keep the rust away for now. The jerry cans with diesel have also made some damage to deck and had to be moved around on deck a bit. I wish of course that we’d have more space for stuff on deck but we’ll just have to make the best of what we have.

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The flooded dock in Mandal

For now, it’s supposed to rain pretty much constantly for the next ten days. We don’t really have the liberty to wait that long so even though it will be wet, we’ll be sailing on as soon as the low pressure have passed and the waves are down at a respectable level. The exposed coastline up to Stavanger is long and I’d hate to have side-waves all the way. My dream is for the winds to turn north and give us a great long surf the whole way. One can only dream. Until then, Simen has connected the PlayStation and I’ll be working on some writing.

Captain Jack

Prepping for the Norwegian Sea

For the first day since we started our journey north, we’ve had calm seas and hail. Apart from the hail it was amazing to have the autopilot finally getting to do it’s job. Most of the day we enjoyed reading books and sipping a nice cup of coffee. We have this little camera pointing forward to see ships and other things that may get in our way and it seem to work fine whenever there is no rain or anything else blocking the view. We can sit at the chart-table and just pop our heads up to check for other ships once in a while. The sad news is that another storm is coming this weekend. We have to use the days between the storms effectively to get as far as possible, but then there’s this balance of taking care of ourselves, stay safe and enjoy the journey at the same time.  

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A serious Captain Simen reading his book.

We docked in Kristiansand. It’s a fairly big city in Norway of well over a hundred and ten thousand people. Lucky for us they had electricity for heat. My hopes of filling our cans of water disintegrated as I almost walked right off the pier. The people running this place had disconnected the whole pier, no wonder there were no other boats around. Result was; we suddenly had our own little downtown island, cut off from the world with barely enough water for the super-important coffee next morning.

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The trip down the coast to our next destination was short and sweet. We only did 24 nautical miles with an average of 4 knots. It was a beautiful day on the water, the best so far – probably what is know to be the silence before the storm. It’s not that I would ever complain about this horrible weather, but if the gods get what they want it will be shitty for the next 5-6 days. We can take a bit of wind, we can take a bit of waves, we can respectfully take some rain and even snow – but not all at once. Better stay put and await further orders.

In the last post i mentioned that Lindesnes is the most southern point of Norway, I’ll take this back, I stand corrected – cause it’s not. It will however be our most southern point on our venture north from Fredrikstad. The most southern point, and I learned this yesterday, is actually a small reef called “Pysen” and we passed north of it earlier today.

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Mandal is a whole lot smaller than Kristiansand but have ten times the charm. There is only about 15 thousand people here, and they have all the amenities you could need in a small place like this. Time will show if its enough to keep us occupied during our stay. To get here we passed through an amazing archipelago with hundreds of cabins in all shapes and sizes. The people we have met so far have been most welcoming and we’ve found a great spot in the harbour. This is of course one of the best things about living onboard, most of the time you get to live in the down-town area of the cities you visit. This give you short walks to almost anything.

Besides reading a few books and drinking tons of coffee, we are settling in for a few quiet days in the boat. If we are really lucky we’ll even get to take a shower in the service house which for some reason stands unlocked. From here I have calculated about 20 active days of sailing to hit Trondheim. It’s a reach, but our working-goal is to hit Trondheim before March 15th. It’s possible to make it – but as we will be entering the Norwegian Sea whenever we start from Mandal we need to get the boat back to ship shape first. We are likely to encounter quite a few waves and there is still many weeks left of this years storm season.

Captain Jack