The Magical island

I let the crew sleep in this morning. Shoveling snow on deck and the cockpit in the morning is not on the top of my list, and it’s supposed to keep snowing for the pressing 18 hours. This combined with what was supposed to be fairly strong winds from West is not the best start for a day at sea, no matter how much coffee you drink. If it clears during the day we may still make the trip toward Brønnøysund where they at least will have a flash of internet. However, while I was asleep the winds have turned a bit more from the North making the coming passage a bit longer than anticipated time wise, and since there is parts of the coast North of here we would like to visit – we are settling in for an early start tomorrow instead.

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We are docked on Leka, an island loaded with geological history and plenty of culture. Minutes after our arrival, while looking for signal on my cell to pay the harbour-fee I stumbled upon Gjermund, the on-guard ambulance-driver of the island. A very nice man with an instant invitation to show us his magical island, as long as he was in reach for for his response time being the only ambulance and all. Saying that health–care providers would gift us their presence in these corona times felt just amazing, but we made sure to keep the governmental recommended distance at all times.

Gjermund is born on the island, he probably know every name and story there is and was willingly sharing with the three of us. First he showed us the second largest tumulus in Norway. It is of course massive, but was plundered a few hundred years back and once stood much larger than what you will see today. We then continued on to a high point on the East side of the island where an old sailor that had to leave his profession already at the age of 16, came back to Leka after spending a year of sickness in Australia. He then started to build his paradise that has since entertained visitors ever since. Today there is a bunch of rock-huts now available for tourists. There is even a small hotel slash bed and breakfast and plenty of space for caravans.

The ride went on with him telling the story of a 3 year old girl that back in 1932, during a baptism was picked up by a flying eagle and taken away.  The whole island came together to look for the little girl. Gjermund took us to the city hall and introduced us to the mayor. And there in the hallway in an install, the little girls dress was hanging next to her little shoe. The dress was ripped by the eagle’s claws. The other shoe was the first trace they found of the girl. It was hours before tree men climbed the mountain and luckily found a cliff where the eagle had taken the little girl. She was alive and lived a long life on the island until she died just 3 years ago.

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Continuing our drive to the west side of the island he showed us a whole mountain of extremely rear stone. At least on the surface of the planet, this type of rock belong far down in the earth and is only present on the surface two other places in the world. Here at Leka you’ll find the largest occurrence of this family in stones. The freshest of the Norwegian occurrence is as old as ten thousand years. Interesting enough, that’s also how long humans have lived on this island. It’s called Olivin and is part of the Serpentine-family in the geological family.

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Gjermund let us off by the local grocery-shop where we got some essentials before making the walk back to the guest harbour. When we got back Gjermund had ended his shift, but his colleague invited us in for some coffee and chocolate sticks. The lady was telling us about a life as an ambulance driver and despite the restrictions with the virus going on we were invited to use the facilities. Which is very good since we are practically out of fresh water, also the restroom came in handy along with the access to the world wide web.

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This morning’s first view

I can only recommend you make your own visit when you come around this area. We will be go on direction North tomorrow. Today we have spent cleaning up the boat and de-ice the ship. An ice-heavy ship is slippery and unpractical for both crew and Captains.

I wonder what tomorrows mysteries will be.

Captain Jack

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