Time to get ship-shape

We have gotten ourselves an extremely optimistic barometer onboard. It constantly show great weather which is quite a walk from the the truth. However, it don’t affect us much. The fall is here and the winds are coming in hard with rain and leafs starting to slowly lose their colors and blow off the trees. It’s beautiful!

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Last night the wind picked up in tune with the waves and even inside the harbour we are bouncing around a bit. It feels great to be back on the water. We have warm clothes and none of us is prone to sea-sickness – I even got to take on my long underwear yesterday! So nothing has stopped us from going over the rig, getting the boat ship-shape and organizing all the stuff inside.

Kaj, Mrs. Kaj and their daughter Kajsa came over yesterday with a spare mainsail they had laying around. This is great news, because of the wind we have not yet had the courage to hoist those already mounted. Doing so would just put us in a bad angle and wouldn’t do much to help us inspect their quality. This will be better done on open water or on land, but again the wind is stopping us from proceeding with these inspections. Onboard we now have two main sails, two genoas and one spinnaker. At least that’s what I think.

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The boat is used to patiently wait to be put to work. Even though she was built in 1984, the first time she tested her abilities at sea was not until 1996. This time however it won’t be that long of a wait. We will set sail the coming week. For now we are contract-locked in the harbour until it is fully paid. We are currently waiting for the banks to transfer money between accounts and this should all be coming through within Wednesday the 18th.

As you maybe can imagine there is a lot to get used to. Captain Simen spent some time yesterday going over the electrical system and so far it all looks good. The only critical thing we have to deal with is a non-functioning steam-light – which in turn can turn out to be a little tricky task. We hope now that the only problem is a broken bulb, but even this has it challenges as it is positioned half way up the mast. In other words; Another job that will have to wait for better wind conditions.

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Our other big concern is of course how much power we will have when we no longer have the support of shore-power. We can always live with a minimum og lights, but in these waters we need to use critical equipment like VHF and navigation-gear. Also the other biggie is  our source of heat. We are currently using a small heating fan, but this will take far too much energy on the water. Our other installment is an built in heating system that takes heat from the engine. Again – this require that we are or have recently been running the engine, a costly affair in the long run. We have been discussing installing a small stove of some kind.

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This is and will not be a problem for the coming weeks, Kaj have been nice enough to equip us with heavy duty winter-sailing suits that can take just about anything. Our own winter wardrobe is also quite extensive so we are not too worried. There is still a couple of months till we hit the coldest of winter – December through March.

All in all the ship has been very well kept. I must say I’m impressed by the work the previous owner has put into it in order to make it suitable for long journeys with comfortable living. It is of course built somewhat 30 years ago and does not have the modern looks of a boat built today. The teak on deck is ready for replacement, or at least a heavy sanding down, but it will have to wait cause this is both a costly and time consuming process. The boat may even be better off if we remove it completely when the time comes.

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Last nights rain proved that we are not taking in any water. Except from a couple of drops where the cable for our mast-top installer antenna comes in. This should be a quick-fix stealing only about ten minutes of our time so we are not really worried at all.

Next big task is to plan our route out of Mäleren. It includes a couple of bridges and a small canal with a single lock system to get us down to sea level. As we have enough of time to basically do whatever we want I will give you no time frame for when we will first introduce our home for salty water.

Captain Jack

2 thoughts on “Time to get ship-shape

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